Memorable

How do you know when ramadan starts?

Last week the day of fasting, soon Ramadan EID; remember how your Ramadan starts? Ramadan is an important time for Muslims around the world, marked by fasting and prayer. This year, the day of fasting began last week, and soon it will be time for Ramadan Eid. As we prepare for this special time, it’s important to remember how our Ramadan starts.

Soon will be eid mubarak
my Ramadan 2019

You may want to know how long is Ramadan.? For those who may not be familiar, Ramadan is a holy month in the Islamic calendar during which Muslims fast from dawn until dusk. It is a time for spiritual reflection, self-improvement, and devotion to Allah. Ramadan Eid, also known as Eid al-Fitr, marks the end of the month of fasting and is a time for celebration and giving.

If you’re looking to learn more about Ramadan, there are plenty of resources available to help you understand the significance of this special time. Whether you’re a Muslim or simply curious about the traditions and practices of this faith, taking the time to learn about Ramadan can be a rewarding experience.

Iftar time
TGi meaning

One important aspect of Ramadan is the practice of T.G.i, which stands for Taraweeh, Giving, and Iftar. Taraweeh refers to the special prayers that are offered during Ramadan, while giving refers to the act of giving to those in need. Iftar is the meal that is eaten at the end of each day of fasting, and is often shared with family and friends.

Think what is the T.G.I meaning during the holy month ? T.G.i is an acronym that stands for Taraweeh, Giving, and Iftar, and is a central aspect of Ramadan, the holy month in the Islamic calendar. Each of these three elements plays a vital role in the practice of Ramadan, and is an important part of the spiritual journey for Muslims around the world.

Taraweeh refers to the special prayers that are offered during Ramadan. These prayers are performed after the Isha prayer and are often led by an imam. The Taraweeh prayers consist of a series of 20 rakats, or units of prayer, and are traditionally performed in congregation in the mosque. Many Muslims view Taraweeh as an opportunity to deepen their connection to Allah and to seek forgiveness for their sins.

Giving is another important aspect of Ramadan, and involves the act of giving to those in need. This can take many forms, from donating to charity to volunteering in your community. Many Muslims view giving as an important way to show gratitude for the blessings they have received, and to help those who are less fortunate. Giving during Ramadan is often viewed as a way to earn rewards from Allah, and is considered to be a form of worship.

Iftar is the meal that is eaten at the end of each day of fasting. Muslims break their fast at sunset with dates and water, and then gather with family and friends to share a meal. The Iftar meal often includes traditional foods, such as samosas, pakoras, and biryani, and is a time for celebration and fellowship. Many Muslims view Iftar as an opportunity to connect with their loved ones and to express gratitude for the blessings of Allah.

Taken together, Taraweeh, Giving, and Iftar form the foundation of the T.G.i practice during Ramadan. For Muslims, T.G.i is a way to deepen their connection to Allah and to strengthen their spiritual journey. By engaging in these practices, Muslims can find greater meaning and purpose in their lives, and can experience a deeper sense of peace and fulfillment. So this Ramadan, let us all strive to practice T.G.i with sincerity and devotion, and to deepen our connection to Allah and to our fellow human beings

As you prepare for Ramadan Eid, it’s important to remember the true spirit of this holy month. Whether you’re fasting, giving to charity, or simply taking time to reflect on your faith, Ramadan is a time to deepen your connection to Allah and to strengthen your spiritual journey.

So as we approach the end of Ramadan, let’s take a moment to remember how our Ramadan started, and to renew our commitment to this important time of reflection, prayer, and giving. Ramadan Mubarak to all!

Ruslan Smirnov (Remindable)